Tuesday, March 17, 2015

EPA to Regulate Backyard BBQs?

Grilling BBQ steakThe Environmental Protection Agency has announced that it has funded a study to reduce the particulate matter that is emitted from barbecue grills in an effort to clean up our air. The University of California project seeks to limit emissions from grease drippings with a special tray that is inserted under the meat before it is flipped, then the tray is immediately removed. They are also proposing a new catalytic filtration system.

The school claims that the $15,0000 study has the "potential for global application".

The expected results, according to the proposal:
"We expect to limit the overall air pollution PM [particulate matter] emissions from barbecuing and to alleviate some of the acute health hazards that a barbecue pit master can experience from inhalation. The particulate matter present during cooking with and without the grease diverter and PM2.5 filters will be tested and compared to that of current data using a conventional propane barbecue using a fumehood chamber with detectors at CE-CERT. Personal exposure of PM2.5 will also be monitored throughout the experimentation period to determine the degree of acute exposure of particulates to the cook."

A Missouri state Senator, Eric Schmitt (R), on Monday kicked of a #PorkSteakRebellion to grow awareness of the study and to call for the EPA to back off of backyard BBQs.

Senator Schmitt called on people to grill in their backyards this week as a form of a "peaceful protest".

“The idea that the EPA wants to find their way into our back yards, where we’re congregating with our neighbors, having a good time, on the 4th of July, barbecuing pork steak or hamburgers, is ridiculous and it’s emblematic of agency that’s sort of out of control,” Schmitt said.

According to the EPA:

Objective: To perform research and develop preventative technology that will reduce fine particulate emissions (PM2.5) from residential barbecues. This technology is intended to reduce air pollution as well as health hazards in Southern California, with potential for global application.

Expected Results: We expect to limit the overall air pollution PM emissions from barbecuing and to alleviate some of the acute health hazards that a barbecue pit master can experience from inhalation.

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